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Treatment simplification strategies news

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Dual therapy with Kaletra and 3TC works well regardless of viral load

A dual combination of lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra or Aluvia) plus 3TC (lamivudine, Epivir) as first-line therapy produced good virological suppression regardless of baseline viral load and was well tolerated

Published
20 October 2013
By
Liz Highleyman
HIV Dual Therapy Matches Standard Triple Cocktail

A two-drug regimen (lopinavir/ritonavir plus lamivudine) for HIV did as well in controlling the virus as a standard triple-drug cocktail, researchers found. After 48 weeks of therapy with the dual-drug regimen, 88.3% of patients had undetectable virus.

Published
19 October 2013
From
MedPage Today
MODERN Study Stopped: An NRTI-Sparing, Two-Drug Initial Regimen Disappoints Again

In case you didn’t know, “MODERN” is the clever name for the “Maraviroc Once-daily with Darunavir Enhanced by Ritonavir in a New regimen” trial, which compared TDF/FTC to maraviroc, both with boosted darunavir. And once again, the NRTI-sparing two-drug regimen comes up short.

Published
17 October 2013
From
NEJM Journal Watch
PI monotherapy for HIV — an idea whose time has passed?

Patients who switched from suppressive triple-drug therapy to boosted protease-inhibitor monotherapy had unreasonably high rates of treatment failure.

Published
05 December 2012
From
Journal Watch
Are antiretroviral switch or simplification studies of benefit for patients?

The attitude of physicians, ethics committees and medical journals to antiretroviral switch and simplification studies needs to be radically reappraised, according to an article published in PLoS Medicine.

Published
15 August 2012
By
Michael Carter
Boosted darunavir monotherapy works well in two studies

Ritonavir-boosted darunavir (Prezista) alone maintains HIV suppression in most patients who achieved an undetectable viral load on combination antiretroviral therapy, according to two studies presented

Published
23 July 2009
By
Liz Highleyman
High failure rate for people with low CD4 nadirs in Kaletra monotherapy study

An unexpectedly high failure rate was seen in patients taking boosted lopinavir (lopinavir/ritonavir: Kaletra) as their only HIV drug, according to a Swiss study presented

Published
16 February 2009
By
Gus Cairns
EACS: Kaletra monotherapy may need excellent adherence to work

Two studies of using lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra) in a one-drug-only anti-HIV regimen (monotherapy) have both found that the success of this strategy depends on excellent adherence.

Published
31 October 2007
By
Gus Cairns
Two-drug maintenance with tenofovir-efavirenz less effective than triple therapy

A team of French investigators have found a two-drug maintenance regimen of tenofovir (Viread) and efavirenz (Sustiva) to be less effective than a three-drug combination

Published
10 October 2006
By
Derek Thaczuk
BHIVA: Kaletra monotherapy has benefits in clinical practice for highly treatment-experienced

Almost two-thirds of highly treatment-experienced patients who switched from standard multi-drug antiretroviral therapy to Kaletra monotherapy achieved and maintained an undetectable viral load for over

Published
07 April 2006
By
Michael Carter

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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