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South Africa's PMTCT programme reduces mother-to-child transmission to under 4%

Nine years after the start of a national prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) programme, South Africa’s mother-to-child HIV  transmission (MTCT) rate is under 4% at four to eight

Published
19 July 2011
By
Carole Leach-Lemens
South Africa is moving towards an AIDS-free generation, and improving survival in children living with HIV

Reductions in vertical HIV transmission to infants and improvement in paediatric survival attributable to the scale of and quality improvement of prevention of parent-to-child transmission (PPTCT) and antiretroviral

Published
22 June 2011
From
HIV & AIDS treatment in practice
Breastfeeding infants with HIV may develop drug resistance from ARVs in breast milk

Two thirds of breastfeeding infants infected after birth, born to mothers on antiretroviral therapy (ART), developed resistance to one or more antiretroviral drugs according to Clement Zeh and

Published
31 March 2011
By
Carole Leach-Lemens
Watch for malnutrition risk in children with HIV after starting ART

One in nine HIV-infected children with advanced illness was hospitalised with severe malnutrition within 12 weeks of starting antiretroviral and these children had a 15-fold increased risk of

Published
29 March 2011
By
Carole Leach-Lemens
Feeding Hazard for HIV-Exposed Kids Detailed

Pre-chewing food for children appears to be common practice among caregivers of children who were perinatally exposed to HIV, the CDC reported.

Published
14 March 2011
From
MedPage Today
Six months of nevirapine prophylaxis for breastfeeding infants reduces transmission by 76% if mother not on ART

Extending the use of daily infant nevirapine to six months reduced the risk of breastfeeding mother-to-child transmission by a significant 76% in HIV-positive mothers with CD4 cell

Published
07 March 2011
By
Carole Leach-Lemens
KENYA: Hungry HIV-positive mothers wary of exclusive breastfeeding

Nutrition experts recommend that HIV-positive mothers exclusively breastfeed their babies for the first six months to reduce the risk of HIV transmission, but food-insecure Kenyan mothers worry they have insufficient milk to keep their babies full and healthy.

Published
22 February 2011
From
IRIN Plus News
London: HIV test for baby given strangers' breast milk in hospital mix-up

A premature baby had to be tested for HIV after blundering hospital staff twice gave her breast milk from strangers.

Published
23 December 2010
From
London Evening Standard
Despite Health Warnings More Women Sharing Breast Milk Online

A growing number of nursing moms are taking to the Internet to find other women to share breast milk with so they don't have to switch to formula for their babies. But it's a trend that federal health officials find increasingly alarming.

Published
03 December 2010
From
AOL
Nigeria: 'HIV Mothers Can Breastfeed Their Babies for 3 Months'

The need for HIV positive mothers to breastfeed their babies for at least three months to give them a head start in life has been emphasized by the Nursing and Midwifery Council of Nigeria.

Published
07 September 2010
From
AllAfrica

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Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.