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Issue 205: April 2011

Published: 01 April 2011

  • In this issue

    HIV is still complicated. In the last two decades a universally lethal illness has been transformed into an infection people can live with for a relatively normal...

  • HIV drug prescribing in London: changes from this month

    From April 2011, the preferred first- and second-line drug regimens for HIV-positive people in London are changing. The change in prescribing practice will not initially affect people...

  • Testing…testing…one, two, three

    When you visit your HIV clinic, they will be measuring a lot more than just your CD4 count and viral load. What else are they checking and...

  • HIV and lymphoma

    Guest writer Matt Sharp updates HTU on a group of cancers that still cause premature deaths in people with HIV, though cure rates are improving....

  • News in brief

    Five US patients have had a proportion of their CD4 cells made immune to infection with the strain of HIV they have.1 The therapy, which could be the...

  • We’re getting there: towards a comprehensive hepatitis C cure

    Research on new cures for hepatitis C has made rapid progress, Gus Cairns reports....

This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
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This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.